Toyota PKSB Malfunction (Solved & Explained)

Issues with the PKSB are common. The reasons for a malfunctioning PSKB are likely bad wiring, computer glitches, or bad or broken sensors.

What are the main causes of a Toyota PKSB malfunction?

The Toyota company has created several great technology systems over the past decade. Many of these technologies have prevented drivers from crashing, which also prevents injuries, deaths, and major repair bills. 

One of these technologies is the PKSB or Parking System Brake. But these technologies are not perfect, and they will occasionally stop working.

Where the PKSB is experiencing a malfunction issue, a warning light will appear on the dashboard. When the PKSB is not working, it will affect the performance of the automatic emergency braking system.

What are the causes of the PKSB malfunction?

Many drivers really appreciate Toyota for creating the PKSB system. Backing up and parking is very difficult, even for the most experienced driver. But, like any system, the PKSB system can start malfunctioning. It will no longer work as well as it did. 

What are the main causes that would cause the PKSB to malfunction?

Malfunctioning sensors – Sensors can become old and stop working correctly. The manufacturer might even install the sensors incorrectly. 

With one little bump or minor collision, the sensors can disconnect from the computer system. Even swerving too fast can disconnect the sensors from a bad connection. 

If the sensors are old, then ask your mechanic to replace them as soon as possible. The cost of replacing a driving sensor on a vehicle is $275 to $350. This cost does take into account the sensor and the labor, but the cost of labor can vary.

Damaged Sensors- the PKSB sensors are located all around the front and back of the Toyota vehicle. If you get into a collision, even a minor one, the center can become damaged. 

It is easy to damage a sensor; even a bike could break one. Also, rain, mud, and dirt could slip behind the sensor and corrupt the wiring. There’s no need to try to repair a sensor. Just replace it and clear out any dirt or grime that is in or around the sensor socket. 

Bad wiring – the wires that connect the PKSB sensors and system to the computer and to the battery could fall apart. It is possible the manufacturer-installed bad sensors or bad wiring.

Also, if your car overheats for any reason, some of the overheating could cause a sensor near the middle of the engine to melt. 

If the wiring goes bad, the computer system cannot provide an adequate amount of electricity to the sensor and to the other parts of the PKSB system. The cost to replace battery wiring depends on the vehicle. 

A total and complete vehicle rewiring cost about $1,300 for just the wires alone. But you’re not looking to replace all the wires, just the ones around the sensor. It should be around $500.

Issues with the braking system – the same system that alerts the driver to a near collision with a vehicle or object also activates the brakes.

But if there’s an issue with the brakes, then the PSKB either cannot activate the brakes in time, or the system will think that it activates the brakes, but the brakes do not activate at all. 

Head over to your mechanic and have your brakes serviced. Brake inspection should cost only $100. If they do find something, then you will have to get your brakes repaired.

Reset the ECU before heading to your mechanic

Before you shell out money for repairs, try resetting the computer system inside your vehicle. Sometimes a reboot can clear away corrupted data and make your vehicle work as if it is brand new. Restarting the ECU on a Toyota is easy. 

All you need to do is to disconnect the Negative and battery terminals ‌on your vehicle’s battery underneath the hood.

While the cables are disconnected, make the battery and negative terminal cables touch each other for 2 minutes. 

After 2 minutes have passed, reconnect the terminals, and the ECU should be completely reset.

What is the purpose of the Toyota PKSB?

The Toyota PKSB is another name for the Toyota Parking Support Brake. It is a technology designed by the Toyota company to help the driver with shifting into and out of park. 

Not only does it assist the driver when they are slowing down and stopping to park, but it will also help the driver maintain speed when shifting out of park and into drive.

Even when driving at very low speeds, it can be quite easy for a driver to underestimate the size of their car. They can end up in a low-speed parking collision with another vehicle or an object. 

The PKSB will alert the driver if the front or back bumper of the Toyota vehicle is too close to a car or object. It will warn the driver when they are about to hit something. 

If the driver cannot react in time, then the computer system will take command and automatically break before the vehicle collides with the car or object.

If the vehicle’s computer system takes control of the vehicle when a collision is imminent, then is the driver always perfectly safe? 

Will drivers no longer have to watch what they are doing because they know the computer system will make up for their mistakes? 

No, of course not. The PKSB system is not a perfect system and it cannot correct every single mistake a driver makes. 

Plus, if the vehicle is moving too fast, even if the PKS B system activates the brakes, the momentum of the car will still cause the car to go backward or forwards. The vehicle may end up hitting the object or car anyway.

Conclusion

The Toyota PKSB is the Toyota Parking Support Brake, and it’s supposed to help drivers shift in and out of park. If PKSB is malfunctioning, there’s likely a problem with the computer system that dictates information from the sensors to the parking apparatuses. 

There could also be an issue with the parking brakes. It is also common for Toyota manufacturer to make their Toyota vehicle with bad wiring around the parking support brake. Resetting the ECU should wipe away any computer glitches that could cause the PKSB to malfunction.